Text Size: Small Text Medium Text Large Text
Contrast: Standard Contrast High Contrast

News Room


In The News

Visionary Newsletter - Summer 2013 Special Educational Initiatives Issue

Visionary - Summer 2013

In this special issue, Dr. Yuri McKee, a Price Vision Group surgeous shares his experience teaching doctors glued IOL and DMEK transplant techniques at Tilganga Institute of Ophthalmology in Kathmandu, Nepal. The Foundation announces it’s Cornea Research Luncheon & Auction featuring Nancy Noel as Honorary Chair. This luncheon commemorates the 25th Anniversary of the Cornea Research Foundation of America. The Cornea Classic results are shared and Dr. Marianne Price explains the educational initiatives of the Foundation.
Visionary_-_Summer_2013.pdf

Visionary Newsletter - Spring 2013 Special Cataracts Issue

Spring 2013 Visionary

In this issue, Patient Ann Crupi shares her experience with cataracts and a DMEK cornea transplant and Marianne Price explains cataracts and lens options after surgery and provides a research update. Dr. Francis Price explains in his Ask the Doctor column the risks and benefits to doing a cataract surgery at the same time as a cornea transplant. Visionary_-_Spring_2013.pdf

DMEK Breakthrough Breakthrough for Cornea Transplant Recipients

INDIANAPOLIS—October 21, 2011—The Cornea Research Foundation of America today announced an important breakthrough expected to significantly reduce organ rejection from 12 percent to less than 1 percent.

Each year approximately 40,000 Americans need a cornea transplant to restore vision, so they can return to work, support a family, and resume essential daily activities such as driving and reading. These patients are eager to preserve the precious gift of sight they received from a generous family who lost a loved one, and this breakthrough should significantly improve their chances. The cornea is about the thickness of a credit card and is comprised of three distinct layers. Although corneal problems are usually localized to just one or two layers, the traditional approach was to replace them all.

Dr. Francis Price, Jr., founder of the Cornea Research Foundation, has helped pioneer targeted cornea transplant techniques that replace only the diseased portion of the cornea, leaving healthy layers intact. Only the ultra-thin cell layer lining the inner surface of the cornea is diseased in about half the patients who need a cornea transplant. According to Dr. Price, “Replacement of the inner cell layer with a single cell layer from a donor cornea (a technique known as DMEK) provides much better and faster visual recovery than earlier methods.”

The principal reason cornea transplants fail is because the recipient’s body sometimes recognizes the donor tissue as foreign and mounts an attack against it. Today Dr. Marianne Price, Executive Director of the Cornea Research Foundation, reported at the joint Cornea Society and Eye Bank Association of America Scientific Symposium, held in Orlando FL, that single-layer DMEK grafts are 15- to 20-times less likely to be rejected than earlier techniques that include two or more layers of the cornea. According to Dr. Price, “99% of our DMEK recipients remain rejection-free at two years and beyond. Having a transplant technique that can better elude rejection is a huge breakthrough for cornea transplant recipients.”

Barraquer Award Francis W. Price, Jr., MD receives Barraquer Award

International Society of Refractive Surgery of the American Academy of Ophthalmology Honors Francis W. Price, Jr., M.D. with the Barraquer Award

SAN FRANCISCO – The International Society of Refractive Surgery (ISRS), a partner of the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO),will acknowledge Frank W. Price, Jr. at the 2011ISRS Award Reception in Orlando, in conjunction with the Academy’s Annual Meeting.

Frank W. Price, Jr., MD, is the 2011recipient of the Barraquer Award, which honors a physician who has made outstanding contributions in the field of refractive surgery during their career and who exemplifies the character and scientific dedication of José I. Barraquer, MD, one of the founding fathers of refractive surgery.Dr. Price is medical director of Price Vision Group and founder and president of the Board of Cornea Research Foundation of America. He has been named one of the Best Doctors In America® and has published over 125 peer-reviewed articles.

ISRS will also honor the following physicians for their dedication and contributions to the profession and to the society:
• A. John Kanellopoulos, MD (Greece) – Lans Distinguished Award
• Bruno M. Fontes, MD, PhD (Brazil) -20th Annual Richard C. Troutman MD DSc (HON) $5,000 Prize
• David R. Hardten, MD (USA) – Casebeer Award
• Francesco Carones, MD (Italy) -  Founder’s Award
• J. Bradley Randleman, MD (USA) – Kritzinger Memorial Award
• Jack T. Holladay, MD (USA) – Presidential Recognition Award
• LucioBuratto, MD (Italy) – Lifetime Achievement Award

Descriptions of the awards and recipient bios are available on the ISRS website. The ISRS Award Reception is an annual celebration of refractive, cornea, cataract and lens-based surgery for leaders in the field.

Santa Caterina Award Santa Caterina International Prize awarded to Drs. Francis and Marianne Price

Indianapolis—March 1, 2011—World-renowned eye surgeon Dr. Francis W. Price, Jr. and wife Marianne Price, PhD were presented with the “Santa Caterina Oro Città di Siena” International Prize on February 27, 2011 in Siena, Italy. Drs. Price traveled to Siena and were honored at the ceremony receiving the Santa Caterina gilded statue at the Teatro dei Rozzi in Siena.
Francis W. Price Jr., MD of Price Vision Group is the founder and president of the Cornea Research Foundation of America, and his wife, Marianne is the Foundation’s executive director. Together they were chosen as recipients of the Santa Caterina prize as their research has led to significant improvements in cornea transplant surgery and treatment of eye diseases around the world.
Each year, ten recipients from different areas of expertise all over the world are selected to receive this prestigious award. The Prices commented, “We feel blessed to have found better ways to give people back the use of their eyes and to have had the opportunity to share improved techniques with eye care professionals nationally and internationally.” For more information on their work, visit http://www.cornea.org.

LASIK/Contact Lens Study LASIK / Contact Lens Study Continuing Enrollment

LASIK / Contact Lens Study Continuing Enrollment

INDIANAPOLIS—August 10, 2011—The Cornea Research Foundation of America, based in Indianapolis, is conducting a national clinical survey study comparing visual results, patient satisfaction and quality of life issues as they relate to LASIK and contact lenses. Price Vision Group is the local site for this national, multi-center study.
This is the first prospective study to follow these two popular methods of vision correction for nearsightedness, astigmatism, and farsightedness simultaneously.
Qualified candidates for the LASIK portion of the study must be above age 21, have naturally occurring nearsightedness, farsightedness and/or astigmatism and have had no prior eye surgery. To participate in the contact lens portion of the study, qualified candidates must meet the above criteria, and have worn contact lenses at least 5 years.

The goal of the study is to enroll a total of 5,000 patients - both those undergoing LASIK, and patients who will continue to wear contact lenses. The end point will be to determine if visual satisfaction, visual complaints and safety – as reported by participants – are similar or different between the two groups.
Patient consents and surveys will be conducted over the internet using a HIPAA compliant web portal that will automatically coordinate future patient surveys at the one, two and three-year anniversaries of the study date of entry.
Study sites throughout the United States are currently enrolling patients in the study. Qualified candidates in the study could receive compensation for their participation in and completion of the study. For more information about the study, or to see if you qualify, candidates in Indianapolis should visit http://www.pricevisiongroup.com or call 317-814-2935. Visit http://www.cornea.org for a complete list of participating sites throughout the United States.

Clayton Ingram, Age 88 is not too late!

Imagine finally getting the clearest vision of your life when you’re in your 80’s. Surprisingly, this happens more frequently than one would think; individuals go through life not finding treatments for their conditions until later years of life.  Once they hear of a possible solution, patients often ask if they are too old for cornea transplant surgery. Our response, “Are you ever too old to see?”

We were recently fortunate to speak in depth with Dr. Clayton Ingham, a retired dentist and recreational cartoonist.  As a patient at Price Vision Group, Dr. Ingham received two cornea transplants at the age of 88 in 2010. After asking him what he enjoys most now that his vision has been improved, his answer was simple, “I’ve been having a wonderful time with the television. I was never able to watch hockey because I could never see the puck. It would be nice to go back and watch high school games that I couldn’t enjoy when I was younger.”

Click on the Summer 2011 Visionary to continue reading Dr. Ingham’s story.

Visionary:  10781_PVG_Newsletter_FINAL.pdf10781_PVG_Newsletter_FINAL.pdf

Cartoon:  Clayton_Ingham_Illustrations.pdfClayton_Ingham_Illustrations.pdf

A Young Man Receives a Cornea Transplant Thanks to a Community Collaboration

While on a break from a construction site one sunny afternoon in Quito, Ecuador, a young stone mason shared his story of vision impairment with two brothers, and as a result his life has been changed forever.

Through a collaboration of good will, the Cornea Research Foundation of America, in partnership with the Indiana Lions Eye and Tissue Transplant Bank, Quito Barrio Outreach, an organization that supports poor communities in Quito, Ecuador and several generous church groups in Illinois, Luis Almeida has regained the gift of sight.

While on a church mission trip to construct a second story on an adult education center in the Rancho Alto barrio outside Quito, Ecuador, brothers Jim and Jack Herrmann, along with other members of the church mission, befriended an Ecuadorian stone mason named Luis Almeida. Working alongside Luis and other locals, they would all enjoy a beer together after they finished for the day. Although Jim and Jack did not speak Spanish, they immediately bonded with the Spanish-speaking man, his wife Veronica and his two young children, Kevin and Camilla.

While on a break one afternoon, Luis pointed to his eyes—trying to communicate that there was a problem. Another man on the mission team, Lupe Alvarez, had helped translate before when they could not get past the language barrier. As Lupe translated, they learned that Luis was almost blind in one eye and could not see well out of the other.

Click here to read the whole story. Luis_Almeidas_Story.pdf

Opportunities and Considerations of Conducting Clinical Research In Unsettled Economic Times

Marianne Price

Clinical research studies can provide rewarding opportunities for medical practitioners. Studies allow doctors to provide patients with early access to promising new treatments that may otherwise take years in the United States to obtain approval. Especially in challenging economic times, patients may appreciate the chance to receive compensation and/or discounts on treatment and medications through study participation. In addition, engaging in clinical research can be intellectually stimulating for physicians and staff. Newcomers to clinical research should consider various aspects of research before beginning the study.

Consider staff training
Study site personnel must be trained and knowledgeable about good clinical practices, protection of human subjects, confidentiality of protected health information, and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations. Increasingly, government resources are being devoted to auditing clinical sites, and you, rather than the sponsor, will be held completely responsible for how the study is conducted at your site.

Consider the criteria
Before agreeing to participate in a study, carefully examine the criteria for study participation specified in the protocol. Sometimes the criteria are extremely restrictive, and it can be frustrating to expend time and effort screening patients only to find a few actually qualify for the study. Make sure that the clinical trial agreement provides reasonable compensation for screening costs. Also, check on whether compensation is included for long-term storage of the copious documents typically generated in the conduct of a clinical study and for the expense incurred if your site is selected for an FDA audit. Clinical trial agreements often fail to recognize these costs, so you may need to specifically ask that they be included.

Consider patient expectations
Allocate extra time for counseling potential study participants to ensure patients understand what the study entails so they can provide informed consent. In randomized clinical trials, be prepared to deal with disappointment from patients who are desperately seeking a new treatment if they are randomized to a control group that only receives placebo. You can explain to them that if we were certain that the treatment worked, we wouldn’t need to do the study.

Consider the Impact of tightening regulations
The current economic and regulatory environment is creating new challenges for clinical research. On the one hand, we are fortunate to live at a time when so many new ideas exploring how to treat different medical problems are being generated. Each of these new ideas has to be tested in clinical trials to demonstrate safety and efficacy.

On the other hand, the economic collapse last year has made it more difficult for small start-up companies, where many new ideas originate, to obtain the necessary funding to conduct clinical trials. Furthermore, the regulatory hurdles and expense of getting new drugs and devices approved is increasing exponentially. This reduces the incentive for companies to initiate clinical trials unless the medical condition being targeted is relatively common, so that the potential market for the new product will be sufficiently large to recoup the investment.

Consider outsourcing
Outsourcing, as we have seen in other areas of the economy, is an interesting development in clinical studies. Companies are increasingly recruiting study sites and participants outside of the United States, because more are able to demonstrate the ability to meet strict U.S. standards and are less expensive.

Despite these considerations and the faltering economy, many opportunities to participate in clinical research studies are available. A good way to get started is to make your interest in research known to the medical companies whose products you use regularly. Ask if they are looking for new study sites for their clinical trials. Or suggest a new study idea. If they think it has promise, they can help provide the funding and advice necessary to help you carry it out. Also talk to others who are undertaking research here in Indiana. They may have ideas and considerations to help, too.

Latest Additions to the Board of Directors

Toula Oberlies
Toula Oberlies
Jim Butler
Jim Butler

2009:  Toula Oberlies
Mrs. Oberlies is a graduate of Ohio University, and a former early childhood educator, child care center director, and producer of children’s musical programs.  A long time volunteer at Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, she is a member of the board of the Blind Children’s Foundation, having served several terms as President of the Board, and a past member of the Board of Trustees of the Young Singers Foundation. She serves Sweet Adelines International on the local, regional, and international level.  Mrs. Oberlies was born in Greece and lived abroad before becoming an American citizen.

2009:  Jim Butler  
Mr. Butler graduated from Notre Dame with a degree in metallurgical engineering and held a commission in the US Navy.  A retired metallurgist with US Steel, he became an expert in steels for aircraft, guided missiles and rockets.  His many interests include serving in his church, and as past president of the Indianapolis Speech and Hearing Center.  An investor, Mr. Butler supports several research-related and other entrepreneurial enterprises in central Indiana.

Dr. Francis Price, Jr. Recognized by the New England Ophthalmological Society

INDIANAPOLIS, September 25, 2009. In the John Hancock Hall of the Back Bay Event Center in Boston, Massachusetts, Dr. Price was recognized as a guest of honor of the Society at its 726th meeting.  During the meeting, Dr. Price gave a presentation on the new corneal transplant procedures known as DSEK, DMEK or DMAEK.  Later, he was gifted with a beautiful sterling silver replica of a “Liberty Bowl” originally designed in 1768 by silversmith, Paul Revere.  Copies of these bowls are now referred to as “Revere Bowls” and are used by the Society to show appreciation for the contributions of honored guests chosen to present at their annual scientific program.

Indianapolis-based Cornea Research Foundation of America announces inaugural Torchbearer Award winner

Spain’s Dr. Jorge Alió receives recognition for development of non-invasive method to treat glare and halos post laser surgery

INDIANAPOLIS—Sept. 12, 2009—The Cornea Research Foundation of America, an Indianapolis-based non-profit organization with the mission to give people back the use of their eyes,  announces today it has selected the first recipient of the Torchbearer Award, Dr. Jorge Alió of Alicante, Spain. The award was presented during last week’s European Society of Cataract & Refractive Surgery Conference in Barcelona, Spain.

The annual award recognizes individuals whose lifetime service and commitment to the field of vision care has helped light the way for others. It was developed by CRFA Founder Dr. Francis W. Price, Jr., M.D. to recognize dedicated ophthalmic research physicians throughout the world.

About Dr. Jorge Alió
Dr. Alio is professor and chairman of ophthalmology at Miguel Hernández University in Alicante, Spain. In cooperation with this institution, he created the Institute of Ophthalmology of Alicante and the Jorge Alió Foundation for the Prevention of Blindness. Due to its advanced technology and high level of patient care, the Institute is considered one of the most important eye care centers worldwide focused in the private sector.

He is being recognized for development of the technique using Yag laser treatments to eliminate epithelial ingrowth after Lasik. Epithelial cells rarely grow into the interface between the Lasik flap and underlying stromal bed after primary procedures. However, after re-treatments, where Lasik flaps are lifted and replaced, epithelial ingrowth can occur in up to 5 to 10 percent of cases. Dr. Alió’s innovative treatment creates a dramatic improvement in this condition. Previously flaps had to be re-lifted to remove the cells. The epithelial ingrowth could recur after its removal, and in some cases the Lasik flaps would require suturing down to prevent the epithelial cells from returning. Now with the use of the YAG laser, there are no more flap lifts or sutures to correct this condition providing better outcomes and more comfortable treatments for patients.

Dr. Alió is a member of 26 scientific societies and holds executive committee positions in the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons, the International Society for Refractive Surgery of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the International Ocular Inflammation Society and the European Association for Vision and Eye Research.

The Cornea Research Foundation of America is a 501 © (3) not-for-profit educational organization that depends on donations, grants, and planned gifts to conduct research and publish findings. The organization was founded by Dr. Francis Price, Jr., M.D., in 1988 with a mission to establish a world center for corneal research and medical education specializing in corneal disease, corneal transplantation and intraocular lens surgery. In 2009, the Foundation established fiscal sponsorship of Working Vision, a non-profit nonprofit charitable organization formed to reduce the incidence of work-related eye injuries in developing nations by distributing new and lightly used safety eyewear to workers. 

Since its inception, the Foundation has been led by Dr. Price and his passion for innovation and lifelong learning. Today the Foundation houses the largest data base of corneal transplant information in the Western hemisphere, has participated in over 80 clinical and investigational studies, and published over 100 papers and manuscripts. The Foundation hosts medical education seminars regularly for physicians and publishes a newsletter for patients to share developments in ophthalmology.  For more information visit http://www.Cornea.org.

Cornea Research Foundation of America announces fiscal support for new Working Vision global non-profit designed to reduce the number of preventable industrial eye injuries worldwide

United States educational institutions, industrial corporations and eyewear manufacturers invited to participate in mission via donations of lightly used safety eyewear

INDIANAPOLIS-Aug. 25, 2009-The Cornea Research Foundation of America, an Indianapolis-based organization with the mission to give people back the use of their eyes, announces today it has established fiscal sponsorship of Working Vision, a new nonprofit charitable organization formed to reduce the incidence of work-related eye injuries in developing nations by distributing new and slightly used safety eyewear to workers. 

The organization is asking for support through partnerships via cash donation or donations of safety goggles from students finishing high school and college chemistry classes, professionals in the U.S. industrial sector and eyewear manufacturers. For more information or to become a partner please visit http://www.WorkingVision.org  or contact Grant Moore (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)).

About Working Vision
Working Vision was established by medical student Grant Moore, who was an intern at CRFA in 2007. During his intern experience, he embraced the organization’s mission and became inspired to reduce the rate of preventable eye injuries in developing nations. 

Dr. Francis Price, the Foundation’s president, introduced Moore to two doctors working in Nepal to learn more about the topic and global issue: Dr. Ruit, the leader of Kathmandu’s Tilganga Institute of Ophthalmology, and Geoff Tabin, M.D., founder of the Himalyan Cataract Project.

In the summer of 2008, Moore traveled to Nepal, where he worked as a research intern with Dr. Ruit. He was astonished by the number of patients he saw with work-related eye injuries. He soon learned that, unlike the United States, which has OSHA regulations, most developing countries lack solid government-mandated occupational safety standards. “Workers living below the poverty line in these countries are not very likely to purchase safety equipment if it is a choice between safety eyewear and food or even education for their children,” says Moore.

Inspired by the work of Dr. Ruit and Dr. Tabin, Moore designed a survey, which is currently being conducted, to better understand the causes and severity of the work-related eye injuries of patients visiting the Tilganga. He returned to America inspired and encouraged to pursue his charitable mission and founded Working Vision.

To date Working Vision has received collaborative support from:

  • The Fred Hollows Foundation in Australia helped Working Vision develop and distribute the survey at eye centers in several Southeast Asian countries.
  • The Cornea Research Foundation of America has agreed to provide fiscal sponsorship for Working Vision, including data management and statistical analysis to document outcomes.
  • Additional companies and universities have come forward to collect and donate protective eyewear for the charitable project. For more information please visit: http://www.workingvision.com.

The Cornea Research Foundation of America is a 501 (c) (3) not-for-profit educational organization that depends on donations, grants, and planned gifts to conduct research and publish findings. The organization was founded by Dr. Francis Price, Jr., M.D., in 1988 with a mission to establish a world center for corneal research and medical education specializing in corneal disease, corneal transplantation and intraocular lens surgery. The Foundation houses the largest data base of corneal transplant information in the Western hemisphere.

Since its inception, the Foundation has been led by Dr. Price and his passion for innovation and lifelong learning. To date, CRFA has participated in over 80 clinical and investigational studies and published over 100 papers and manuscripts. The Foundation hosts medical education seminars regularly for physicians and publishes a newsletter for patients to share developments in ophthalmology.

Cornea Research Foundation of America partners with the National Keratoconus Foundation to present a FREE educational seminar that will bring 100 people to Indianapolis in August

INDIANAPOLIS—July 22, 2009—The Cornea Research Foundation of America, an Indianapolis-based non-profit organization with the mission to give people back the use of their eyes, announces today it is partnering with the National Keratoconus Foundation to present an educational seminar on Saturday, August 29 that will bring approximately 100 people from throughout the United States to Indianapolis.

“Keratoconus is frightening because it strikes at a young age and can progress quickly,” says Marianne Price, executive director of the Cornea Research Foundation of America. “We have partnered with the National Keratoconus Foundation co-sponsoring this seminar to educate patients and family members about the latest research studies and findings on keratoconus. This will serve to empower people affected to seek the best care for themselves and enhance their quality of life. We also are encouraging participants to establish a patient support group so they can connect regularly.“

When: Saturday, August 29, 2009 from 8 a.m. to noon
Where:  Ritz Charles Event Center
                12156 North Meridian Street
                Carmel, IN 46032
What: Updates on Keratoconus, including speakers and patient panel
Cost: Free. Registration is required.
Register: Contact the Cornea Research Foundation of America (317) 814-2993

About Keratoconus
Keratoconus is a non-inflammatory eye condition in which the normally round dome-shaped cornea progressively thins causing a cone-like bulge to develop. The result in the early stages is significant visual impairment with nearsightedness and astigmatism. The condition is estimated to occur in one of every 2,000 people. It is usually diagnosed in young people at puberty or in their late teens. While researchers do not yet know what causes keratoconus, eye rubbing causes it to progress.

Presently keratoconus is treated through eyeglasses, hard contact lenses, and a newer treatment, INTACS plastic rings inserted into the mid layer of the cornea to flatten it, changing the shape and location of the cone.  In 15 to 20 percent of the cases, cornea transplant surgery is necessary. 

The Cornea Research Foundation of America is one of nine sites currently participating in a new clinical research investigation in the United States to study the benefits of corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) in subjects with progressive keratoconus and corneal ectasia after prior refractive surgery.  These studies are the first in the United States. They are designed to assess the safety and effectiveness of CXL for slowing the progression of both of these conditions.

The Cornea Research Foundation of America is a 501 (c) (3) not-for-profit educational organization that depends on donations, grants, and planned gifts to conduct research and publish findings. The organization was founded by Dr. Francis Price, Jr., M.D., in 1988 with a mission to establish a world center for corneal research and medical education specializing in corneal disease, corneal transplantation and intraocular lens surgery. The Foundation houses the largest data base of corneal transplant information in the Western hemisphere.

Since its inception, the Foundation has been led by Dr. Price and his passion for innovation and lifelong learning. To date, CRFA has participated in over 80 clinical and investigational studies and published over 120 papers and manuscripts. The Foundation hosts medical education seminars regularly for physicians and publishes a newsletter for patients to share developments in ophthalmology.

Cornea Research Foundation of America Announces new FDA study to evaluate the Light Adjustable Lens for cataract patients

Foundation will enroll and study 20 central Indiana patients for three years

INDIANAPOLIS—April 12, 2009—The Cornea Research Foundation of America, a not-for-profit organization with the mission to give people back the use of their eyes, announces today it is one of four United States locations participating in a new clinical research study on the light adjustable lens for cataract patients. The Foundation will enroll 20 central Indiana cataract patients and study the effectiveness of the lens over a period of three years.

The Foundation enrolled its first patient last week, a 68 year-old woman who lives in Indianapolis. Cataract patients interested in finding out more about the process or enrolling can contact Dr. Kathy Kelley at the Cornea Research Foundation, 317-814-2859.

About the light adjustable lens
More than three million cataract surgeries are performed each year in the United States with 70 percent of patients requiring glasses for optimal distance vision post surgery. This is caused by a variety of factors, such as wound healing changes, inaccuracies in pre-operative measurements or preexisting corneal astigmatism.

The light-adjustable lens, developed by Calhoun Vision, allows for vision correction after the eye has healed from the cataract surgery. This is done by directing a beam of painless ultraviolet light into the eye and onto the lens for about 90 seconds. This process allows for excellent distance vision without the need for glasses.

“The ability to fine-tune the lens after the healing process is complete is a truly revolutionary and gives us an extra edge in our mission provide each and every patient with the best possible vision,” said Marianne Price, executive director of the Cornea Research Foundation of America.

The Cornea Research Foundation of America is a 501 (c) (3) not-for-profit educational organization that depends on donations, grants, and planned gifts to conduct research and publish findings. The organization was founded by Dr. Francis Price, Jr., M.D., in 1988 with a mission to establish a world center for corneal research and medical education specializing in corneal disease, corneal transplantation and intraocular lens surgery. The Foundation houses the largest data base of corneal transplant information in the Western hemisphere.

Since its inception, the Foundation has been led by Dr. Price and his passion for innovation and lifelong learning. To date, CRFA has participated in over 80 clinical and investigational studies and published over 100 papers and manuscripts. The Foundation hosts medical education seminars regularly for physicians and publishes a newsletter for patients to share developments in ophthalmology.

Indianapolis Medical Professionals Author First-Ever Text On Innovative Sutureless Cornea Transplant Surgery

Royalties to benefit Cornea Research Foundation of America and further research for procedure advancement

INDIANAPOLIS—Feb. 10, 2009—Francis W. Price, Jr. M.D., president of Price Vision Group, along with Marianne Price, Ph.D., executive director of the Cornea Research Foundation of America, have co-authored the first-ever text for medical professionals on a pioneering cornea transplant procedure that is sutureless while offering a quicker recuperation, stronger post-operative eye and excellent clinical results.

All royalty proceeds from the sale of the text will benefit the Cornea Research Foundation of America’s study of the groundbreaking technique. The text and accompanying DVD with 20 videos demonstrating various aspects of the surgical procedure costs $115.00 and is available through Slack Publications

About the Text - DSEK: What You Need to Know About Endothelial Keratoplasty provides a comprehensive background of EK, where it is today, and where it is headed in the future. Francis W. Price, MD, who was the first to complete DSEK in the United States, along with Marianne Price, Ph.D., have designed this text with a special emphasis on how to perform surgeries, along with preventing and managing complications. In addition, a diverse group of contributing authors provides a wide array of insights and tips for better patient outcomes.

Features in the book include:

  • Current applications of DSEK and DSAEK and tips from some of the more than 500 surgeons trained by Dr. Francis Price;
  • Information how to perform DMEK, the newest iteration of EK, including a step by step technique and post operative management;
  • Detailed discussion of air management for EK surgeries and how to avoid unintended consequences;
  • Special techniques for smaller Asian Eye;
  • Three patient interviews that illustrate key advantages over older techniques from the patient’s perspective.

About Endothelial Keratoplasty
The adult cornea is only about 1/2 millimeter thick and is comprised of 3 distinct layers, with the innermost endothelial cell layer pumping water from the cornea to keep it clear.  If damaged or diseased, this cell layer cannot regenerate; as vision worsens, a transplant becomes necessary.  The DSEK procedure is revolutionizing cornea transplants.  Eye Bank Association of America statistics from the past three years illustrate a 10-fold increase in use of the procedure, and show that it has become the surgery of choice for treatment of endothelial problems among ophthalmologists performing corneal transplants.

Instead of replacing the entire full-thickness of the cornea and stitching the transplant to anchor it, as occurs in traditional transplants, surgeons performing DSEK replace only the single damaged layer of endothelial cells. For those patients who are eligible, the procedure offers significant advantages:

  • No post-operative stitches around the cornea which usually require healing that takes over a year before removal.
  • Patients who receive the EK procedure heal and recover vision within three to six months, and some even recover 20/20 vision within a few weeks.
  • The small incision used with DSEK leaves the eye much stronger and more resistant to injury, and patients can return to normal activities much sooner.
  • DSEK can be performed with anesthesia eye drops, instead of requiring a shot near the eye or general anesthesia, which is much safer for the patient.

Just as modern cataract surgery is a huge improvement over older techniques, when patients were bed-ridden for days, DSEK represents an amazing improvement in ease and speed of recovery for transplant patients, compared with older techniques.

Expert Source: Dr. Marianne Price, executive director of the Cornea Research Foundation of America. Dr. Price is a sought after speaker and published author, a member of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, the American Society of Cataract & Refractive Surgery, and Ophthalmic Women Leaders. Dr. Price holds a bachelor’s degree in engineering science from the University of Notre Dame and both an MBA in finance and a doctorate in medical and molecular genetics from Indiana University.

2008 Speaking of Women’s Health Recognizes Marianne Price, Ph.D.

WFYI Broadcasting Salutes Three Individuals at Sold-out Conference

She read books to the blind, imagining how it felt to hear the stories through her voice.  As she read, she deepened her appreciation for the precious gift of sight.  Marianne Price and two other exceptional individuals who have had a positive influence on the lives of Hoosier women were honored for their work on September 12th at the Indiana Convention Center during WFYI Broadcasting’s annual Speaking of Women’s Health conference. The award presentations took place before a sold-out audience of 1, 200 women during the conference luncheon.  Besides Marianne, honorees included Sue Anne Gilroy, vice president of development at St. Vincent Hospital and executive director of the St. Vincent Foundation; and Joann Hofer-Varela, a heart attack survivor and tireless advocate for women’s heart health.

Marianne was introduced as “…a respected scientist, author and recipient of the Melvin Jones Fellows award from the Lions Clubs International Foundation.  She holds a Ph.D. in Medical and Molecular Genetics from Indiana University School of Medicine, and serves on the Prevent Blindness Indiana Board, the I.U. Kelley School of Businesswomen MBA Alumni Advisory Council, and the Research and Scientific Programs Committees of the Eye Bank Association of America.  For her early volunteer work reading to the blind and for her work through the Cornea Research Foundation of America helping preserve and protect vision, we honor Marianne.” 

Sue Anne Gilroy, the first woman to hold the office of secretary of state in Indiana, was the first female UNIGOV director and is now Vice President of Development for St. Vincent Hospital and executive director of the St. Vincent Foundation. 

Three years ago, soon after her second son was born, Joann Hofer-Varela survived a dissected artery that may have been caused by a shift of hormones during labor.  As a result, the left side of her heart was damaged and a defibrillator was chosen as the best course of action.  She has learned to cope with the reality of living with a defibrillator and today volunteers with Women Heart, the only national organization dedicated to promoting women’s heart health.

We are proud and delighted that Marianne’s volunteerism and her hard work at the Foundation have been recognized at this enduring event that celebrates Hoosier women’s health.

Cornea Research Foundation of America Founder Francis W. Price, Jr., MD Named Indianapolis Business Journal Health Care Hero for Advancements in Health Care

Indianapolis Business Journal Health Care Hero - Francis W. Price

INDIANAPOLIS-March 11, 2008-Cornea Research Foundation of America founder Francis Price, Jr. M.D., owner of Price Vision Group, has been named a 2008 Health Care Hero by the Indianapolis Business Journal in the area of Advancements in Health Care.

Now in its eighth year, the Health Care Heroes recognition is an annual acknowledgement of professionals working in health care in central Indiana.  Each year the public nominates their heroes in five categories and a committee of a dozen judges, representing all facets of health care, selects three finalists and a winner in each area.
In honoring Dr. Price as the winner in the Advancements in Healthcare category, IBJ leaders noted the Cornea Research Foundation’s work in several areas including:

  • Creating the largest database in the Western hemisphere to track corneal transplants, which today includes more than 5,000 documented corneal transplant cases.
  • Pioneering work in the area of transplants, including a recent procedure that replaces only the damaged cell layer instead of the entire thickness of the cornea. The procedure, Descemet’s Stripping with Endothelial Keratoplasty (DSEK), is less invasive than traditional surgery and uses no stitches.

 

Drs. Price Recognized by Indiana Lions Club International Foundation

Indiana Lions Award 2007
Shown in the photo standing next to Marianne Price is Nelson Nix, Chairman of the Indiana Lions Eye and Tissue Transplant Bank Board of Directors. Next to Dr. Francis Price is Art Birk, Treasurer of the Indiana Lions Eye and Tissue Transplant Bank Board of Directors

Prestigious award given for dedicated humanitarian services

2008- Dr. Francis Price and Marianne Price, Ph.D. were honored recently for their commitment and contributions to humanity with an award by the Indiana Lions Eye Bank and Tissue Transplant Board of Directors.  The award is named in honor of Melvin Jones, founder of the Lions Club International which began on June 7, 1917 in Chicago, the international headquarters. 

New recipients named as Melvin Jones Fellows are honored each year at the Melvin Jones Fellow luncheon during the International Convention.  Being named a Melvin Jones Fellow is the highest honor to be given by the International Foundation and there have been 266,000 Fellows honored worldwide since the award began in 1973.

Cornea Research Foundation of America Selected for Social Enterprise Award by the Kelley School of Business, Johnson Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Ladies Accepting Social Enterprise Award

INDIANAPOLIS-Oct. 19, 2007-The Cornea Research Foundation of America, founded and led by Dr. Francis Price, Jr. M.D., owner of Price Vision Group, was awarded the Social Enterprise award by the Indiana University Kelley School of Business Johnson Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation.

Forty Indianapolis-area companies were honored in the third annual Indiana Entrepreneurial Awards of Distinction hosted by the organization at the Indiana Roof Ballroom.  The awards were given in four categories:  Growth Award (for companies with at least 35% growth over two years), Spirit Award (for high standards in risk-taking and perseverance), Innovator Award (for pioneering new systems, products or best practices) and Social Enterprise Award (for nonprofits with social missions that have adopted entrepreneurial attributes).

Of 100 entrants, 40 companies were named finalists in the four categories. The Cornea Research Foundation was joined by Second Helpings and Peoples’ Burn Foundation in receiving the Social Enterprise Award.
“This award is a wonderful tribute to our dedicated staff who are committed to our mission of giving people back the use of their eyes through research, innovation, service to humanity and education,” said Dr. Price.

The companies on the list of finalists employ nearly 6,000 people in Indiana and have total revenue of $600 million. The dean of the IU entrepreneurship program, Dr. Donald Kuratko, said, “There is a new culture of growth in Indiana that is having a measurable and significant impact on the state’s economy.  The companies here tonight demonstrate the power of entrepreneurs to convert their dreams into reality; we can all be proud of their contributions and their success in helping to change the world.”

November 2006 - Dr. Price Named Person of Vision for 2006

Francis Price and patient, Ed Jagiela
Dr. Francis Price and patient, Ed Jagiela, who spoke at the reception for Dr. Price.

On Saturday evening, November 4, Dr. Francis W. Price, Jr. was given a standing ovation at the Eye Ball when he was recognized as the Person of Vision for 2006 by Prevent Blindness, Indiana.  The award was created to recognize outstanding leadership, creativity and dedication to giving the gift of sight in the Indianapolis community and beyond.

The new Conrad Hilton was the venue for the gala event.  Senior Pastor Clarence Moore gave a moving invocation before a gourmet dinner was served.  The program began with a history of the award given by Pat Szuch, President. Two of Dr. Price’s patients described the impact that he has had on their lives.  Ed Jagiela, of Merrillville, Indiana, described the joy he has experienced since a successful cornea transplant restored his sight.  He was able to walk both daughters down the aisle on their wedding days, something he had feared might be impossible.  Trischa Hudson spoke of how her life has changed since she received two iris implants.  She has attended law school, graduated and passed the Indiana Bar this past June.  She has also acquired a driver’s license to the amazement of her family, and peers.  Both individuals referred to Dr. Price as a “miracle worker.”

Shortly after, it was time to bring Dr. Price to the stage.  He began by thanking his wife, Marianne, for her inspiration along with his parents, Marianne’s parents, and their son Patrick and his wife for their support of his lifework.  He also gave some insights into the changes he foresees happening in the field of ophthalmology, including the prevention of nearsightedness in the next decade.

The crystal and silver award presented to Dr. Price is meant to symbolize his future-oriented research and his soaring aspirations to be of service to as many people as possible.  It was an elegant evening for a very special person.

Dr. Francis W. Price Receives Indiana Academy of Ophthalmology’s 2006 Silver Recognition Award

We are proud to announce that Dr. Price has been named a 2006 recipient of the Academy’s Silver Recogntion Award for his service contributions to the Academy through presentations, scientific papers and active involvement.  The award is yet another example of Dr. Price’s servant leadership in his field as well as his commitment to excellence in teaching and sharing research findings with fellow physicians.  To be recognized by one’s peers is a pinnacle event in a lifelong career.

Celebration of Light Book Now Available on CD!

Celebration of Life

Cornea Research Foundation announced that their first book, Celebration of Light, has been recorded on a set of four CDs and is available for purchase in the lobby of Price Vision Group in Indianapolis, or through http://www.cdbaby.net  Authors, Elaine Voci and Dr. Frank Price, recorded the book for readers who are blind or visually impaired.

The cost is the same as the $20 paperback; the four-CD set contains a paper insert listing chapter sponsors, and Friends of the Foundation who helped to underwrite the project.  Chapter sponsors include Bosma Industries; Marty Faust of Sarasota, Florida;  the Voci and Belanger families in honor of Connor Belanger; Sherry Kaderli in honor of Dr. Sylvia Norton in Syracuse, New York; Eric Murzyn of Meridian Music, the Wellness & Music Division in Indianapolis; Jake Requard and Visionshare in North Carolina; Marlene Hatch of Prevent Blindness, Indiana; Nyla Johnson in honor of her son-in-law Bob Brock; Patty Garlick; Kristine Smith; Mark Lucas of the United States Association of Blind Athletes in Colorado; and Indiana composer, John Cannaday, whose music graces the CD book.

About Celebration of Light:  Celebration of Light is a collection of 16 inspiring stories told by people whose vision has been restored or enhanced due to cornea research and the treatments that have been developed as a result of research. Writings include stories from eight Hoosiers (including WTHR weatherman and public personality Chris Wright) along with residents from California, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Nevada, New York, North Carolina and Rhode Island. Chapters are divided into sections in which people tell personal stories about common eye disorders and their corrective surgeries, including near sightedness, Fuchs’ Dystrophy, and keratoconus, as well as some unusual corrections such as iris implants. “It is my hope that the book will live up to its title Celebration of Light,” says Dr. Price. “That the book and the stories in it will bring a sense of hope and renewal to readers and serve as a resource for those faced with making tough decisions about cornea related diseases and corrective surgeries.”

How to Order Your Copy:  Copies of the book and CD are available on our website, http://www.cornea.org in the shopping cart section.  The CD is also available on http://www.cdbaby.com and both the book and CD are available in Indianapolis at the Price Vision Group offices located at 9002 N. Meridian Street.  Call Julie Benson at 317-814-2993 to order by phone, or fax 317-814-2806.



Question & Answer


In the News

Visionary Newsletter - Summer 2013
- Read Story

Visionary Newsletter - Spring 2013
- Read Story

Full News List
Visionary Archives
Subscribe